This Year, Make Oral Health A Priority

Happy 2022! We don’t know about you, but we can’t believe that we are starting a new year — time seems to be flying by. The start of a new year provides a clean slate and is a great time to tackle the resolutions you may have made for yourself. Oftentimes, resolutions revolve around improving health, which is one of the reasons gyms and athletic facilities see an increase in enrollment in January. We want to take a minute and discuss your oral health. When was the last time you visited our office for a hygiene examination and cleaning? Postponing and avoiding your dental cleaning and care can lead to less than ideal oral health conditions and the need for extensive and costly treatments. Read on to learn more.

Keep Teeth Healthy This Halloween Season

October is here, and we are sure that you are enjoying all of the fall fun that this season has to offer. October also brings the arrival of many adults’ and children’s favorite holiday — Halloween. While many love the scary movies and costumes, there always seems to be an endless supply of candy and treats at this time. We wanted to share some tips to help keep you from experiencing any frightening tooth issues this season.

Is This Silent Disease Affecting You?

While red is a popular color during the month of February, with the celebration of Valentine’s Day, if you start noticing that your gums are the color of the decorations, you might be suffering from a silent disease. This disease not only affects your oral health, but can impact your overall health as well. Gum disease can be harmful to your teeth and gums, also increasing the risks of some serious health problems. Continue reading to learn more about gum disease and how to prevent it.

How To Prevent Gum Disease

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly half of American adults aged 30 and older have some form of gum disease, also known as periodontal disease. This oral health condition is an infection of the soft tissues that support the teeth and is caused by plaque. Plaque is the sticky film of bacteria that forms on teeth, and when it is left there for too long, it hardens and turns into tartar. It’s tartar that irritates the gums and causes inflammation. If you notice that you have red or swollen gums, bleeding gums after brushing, or sensitive teeth, you might be in the beginning stages of gum disease.